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51 According to his birth certificate, John Joseph McVicker was born on Tuesday, October 6, 1885 in Kirkhills, Antrim Ireland to Margaret Ann McVicker and an unknown father. There are two stories concerning the relationship between Margaret McVicker and John Joseph McVicker. John's daughter, Mary McVicker Youngs, her entire life believed that Margaret was Aunt Maggie, her father's older sister or possibly his great aunt.

The second and perhaps more factual story is based on Johns birth certificate and information that John's daughter Margurite McVicker Campbell learned on a trip to visit the McVickers in Ireland, John was actually the fatherless child of Maggie, who became pregnant with him at the age of twenty-four.

According to the Ireland Census of 1901, both John and his brother James were living with Maggie's father in Kirkhills, Stranocum, Antrim, Ireland in a single room. It can be assumed that Maggie had already left for the US. Maggie's father was seventy-four and a widow according to the census.

Family lore had it that Maggie came to the United States first and worked as a domestic ( a cook) to save up money to bring her brothers, John and James to the United States. At the time John emigrated, Australia was also a destination for the Irish. His choice between the U S and Australia was made by the flip of a coin. John was 20 when he left Londonderry on April 16,1904. He arrived in New York harbor on April 16, 1904.

John McVicker's first job in the United States was with the Euwings (Ewing), who according to Mary McVicker Youngs, owned the Singer Sewing Machine Company. (Research does not show a Euwing/Ewing owning Singer but rather Secor sewing machines.) He trained their horses and spent some time racing them. The Euwings had a summer home in Pond Eddy, New York. It was during his time there that he met Edith Holden (Holdren) whom he ultimately married.

The Euwing's spent their summers in Pond Eddy and their winters in New York City. So after John and Edith were married they followed his job to New York City as this is where the Euwing's were living. It was in while living in New York that Edith became pregnant with their first child. Edith went back to Pond Eddy to have daughter Marguerite.

Some time prior to 1913, John wanted to try farming and Edith did not like living in the city, so they moved to Pennsylvania for a short time. They lived on her parent's, Charles and Estelle Holden's, farm. It was at this home in Scottsville, Pennsylvania that their son, Lee McVicker was born.

In 1914, they were living in Pond Eddy, New York in an apartment. This is where their third child Mary was born. They then moved to Irvington, New York where John was employed at the Burnham Boiler Company. While John worked at the Boiler Company he was also the caretaker for William G. MacAdoo, who was a famous personality during WW I. The McVicker family had a nice home on the MacAdoo estate.

In 1925, John was employed by I.B.M. through the New York office. This job took him to Endicott, New York. At the time, IBM didn't pay well so John went to work for the Endicott Johnson Shoe Company in their Endicott, New York facility working in the tannery. He eventually suffered from "leather poisoning" and developed industrial tuberculosis. Prior to his death, he spent his last two years in the Tuberculosis Sanitarium in Chenango Bridge, New York.

John had a very even disposition and was seldom if ever made. He was kind and loved animals. 
McVicker, John Joseph (I1523)
 
52 According to local Tully, NY historian Nancy Shelly, George Bailer lived with Tom Wood who was half black and half indian. She relates that in April of 1952, the local fire siren sounded. She and her family jumped into their car to see what was happening. On their way they stopped at the "four corners" and noticed a car had run into a truck. They learned that Tom Wood and George Bailer were in the car and that George Bailer had died as a result of the accident. Esther Bailer Sisco remembers that George was known for his delicious sauer kraut.
 
Bailer, George (I1479)
 
53 According to the 1910 federal census, Albert was living with John and Jane.
 
Sisco, John H. (I1316)
 
54 According to the 1910 Federal census, George and Mary had three children as listed and an eighteen year old boarder by the name of Nellie Wheeler.
 
Sisco, George W. (I1317)
 
55 According to the 1970 census Huldah was living with William
 
Harris, Huldah Post (I265)
 
56 According to the newspaper article announcing their 50th wedding anniversary on May 23, 1957, "In 1908 they bought a farm near Navarino, sold later to Ralph Pomeroy. In 1942 they moved to their present home in Navarino." An article from the Tully Times dated May 25, 1907, states, "On Thursday, May 23, at 2:30 p.m. Rev. Willis Bailey united in marriage Miss Luella Hobart and Mr. Fred Bailer. The ceremony was performed at the bride's home immediately after which dinner was served. Mr. Edward bailer, brother of the groom, acted as best man and Miss Dora Hobart, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid. Mr. and Mrs. Bailer left for a short trip to New York. Before leaving they were liberally showered with rice. The happy couple were presented with many handsome and useful presents. Mr. and Mrs. Bailer will make their future home in Otisco." Also in the same paper it was noted that, "Miss Luella Hobart and Fred Bailer were married Thursday at the home of Henry Tuffley."
 
Bailer, Fred (I1481)
 
57 After Luther's mother died of the flu epidemic, he ended up in a children's home in Connecticut. At that time a children's home had a bad reputation as being almost like a juvenile detention center. Olin drove from Pennsylvania to Connecticut and got him out. He became a liability. He began to drink heavily. Olin got a call from the local theater that Luther was at the theater drunk. Come and get him. He went to the slaughter house and brought back pig cholera to Olin's pigs that he was growing for market. Olin was slapping Luther to get him to pay attention and Luther put his fist through the wall.
 
Jamison, Luther William (I1390)
 
58 Age at Death: 38 Williams, Nancy Anna (I902)
 
59 Age at Death: 49 Pray, Sarah (I695)
 
60 Age at Death: 80 Bailer, John (I1126)
 
61 Age at Death: 88 Bailer, Fred (I1481)
 
62 Age: 0 Hinds, Bartlett (I65)
 
63 Age: 0 BAILER, Ethel Mary (I1482)
 
64 Age: 0 Shaw, Hannah (I1608)
 
65 Age: 19 Hinds, Bartlett Jr (I1578)
 
66 Age: 20 Maverick, Rebecca (I1631)
 
67 Age: 21 Hinds, Asa B. (I1572)
 
68 Age: 32 Cosentino, Michael (I1178)
 
69 Age: 39 Maverick, Samuel (I1633)
 
70 Age: 40 Maverick, Abigail (I1630)
 
71 Age: 44 Bailer, Edward (I1517)
 
72 Age: 48 Hinds, Rebecca (I1611)
 
73 Age: 49 Maverick, Elizabeth (I1740)
 
74 Age: 67 Hinds, Bartlett (I65)
 
75 Age: 73 Allerton, Isaac (I1635)
 
76 Age: 74 Youngs, Peter M. (I925)
 
77 Age: 76 Hinds, William Bartlett (I597)
 
78 Age: 78 Sisco, Frances Luther (I1474)
 
79 AIS Mortality Schedules Index Source (S218)
 
80 Albert Sisco's tombstone reads "Albert E. Fransisco" 1877 - 19XX According to the 1910 Federal Census, Albert was living with John H sisco and his wife Jane.
 
Sisco, Albert Ellis (I1318)
 
81 Almiron was killed in a railroad accoident in the train yard. Covey, Almiron (I278)
 
82 Amber Village Cemetery Hobart, Pearl (I1119)
 
83 Amber Village Cemetery Hobart, Clarence Edward (I1124)
 
84 Amber Village Cemetery Bailer, George (I1479)
 
85 Amber Village Cemetery Bailer, Edward (I1517)
 
86 American Genealogical-Biographical Index Source (S569)
 
87 American Genealogical-Biographical Index Source (S585)
 
88 American Genealogical-Biographical Index Source (S614)
 
89 Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1880 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2005), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Tenth Census of the United States, 1880, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1880. Source (S254)
 
90 Ancestry.com, 1850 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2005), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Seventh Census of the United States, 1850, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1850. Source (S463)
 
91 Ancestry.com, 1860 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2004), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Eighth Census of the United States, 1860, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1860. Source (S176)
 
92 Ancestry.com, 1870 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2003), 1870. Source (S462)
 
93 Ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2004), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. Source (S251)
 
94 Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2006), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910. Source (S81)
 
95 Ancestry.com, 1920 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2005), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1920. Source (S83)
 
96 Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2002), United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. Source (S82)
 
97 Ancestry.com, Florida Death Index, 1877-1998 (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2004), State of Florida, Florida Death Index, 1877-1998, Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998. Source (S265)
 
98 Ancestry.com, OneWorldTree (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc.). Source (S1)
 
99 Ancestry.com, Social Security Death Index (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2009), Social Security Administration, Social Security Death Index, Master File, : Social Security Administration. Source (S84)
 
100 Ancestry.com, U.S. World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2007), United States, Selective Service System, Selective Service Registration Cards, World War II: Fourth Registration, National Archives and Records Administration Branch locations: National Archives and Records Administration Region Branches. Source (S310)
 

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